Rope Access Safety

Perhaps for the majority of people, asking someone to hang on ropes instead of standing on scaffolding feels the same as asking them to hop into a roller coaster without a safety belt. How is rope access safe? There are five components that each hold their own safety checks and balances in place. Together these five components create a synergy of work at height that is centered around one thing: double protection.

Number 1-01

Rope Access Written Procedures

Before any team can utilize rope access, a written program must be in place. Similar to a OHS Program, rope access written procedures and forms initiate the action plan to identify the hazards, control procedures, safety responsibilities, and emergency protocols surrounding the use of rope access.

Written Procedures

Number 2-01

Methodology

Contrary to popular belief, there is a method to this madness of executing skilled trades on rope. The requirement for redundancy is the foundation of the rope access system. Sometimes having two of something is better than one. Like two scoops of ice cream. 

Methodology

Number 3-01

TRAINING & PERSONNEL

Rope access training is essential before any person can use a rope access system. There are various certifications available but generally IRATA and SPRAT are the two most recognized rope access certifications in North America. There are checks and balances to ensure trained technicians are held accountable to safe work at height.

Training

Number 4-01

Supervisors

When it comes to rope access work on site, a Rope Access Supervisor must be present to ensure the safety of work. Generally, this is a L3 rope access technician who is competent in supervisory skills, which is separate from their rope access technical skills. 

Supervision

Number 5-01

EQUIPMENT

When it comes to selecting, using, and maintaining rope access equipment, in depth procedures must in place to ensure that the integrity of rope access equipment is maintained. It is crucial to safety that any rope access equipment used for work is fit and equipped for it's intended use. 

Equipment

Latest Safety Blog Posts

How do you determine "Fit for Work" when it's not ...

A big controversial event that happened recently has been the legalization of marijuana. As with ...

Toolbox Talk: Wildfire Smoke

Some of you might have had a similar experience to us this summer where your camping trip has been ...

Permanent and Temporary Anchors – Load Capacity ...

**DISCLAIMER: This is not the official WorksafeBC website. The posts below are merely our ...

Rope Access Equipment: What You Need to Know [OHS ...

**DISCLAIMER: This is not the official WorksafeBC website. The posts below are merely our ...

Do I have to Use a Two Rope System? [OHS 34.6]

**DISCLAIMER: This is not the official WorksafeBC website. The posts below are merely our ...